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London Underground hallway entrance, Tottenham Court Road station, 1998

In constructing the London Underground there were large holes bored out…and there were small holes. This is a typical intersection between the two.

The Tottenham Court Road station green accent color is especially evident, here.

London Underground platform, Northern line, Tottenham Court Road station, 1998

This shot of a platform in Tottenham Court Road station on the Northern line gives a view encompassing the distinctive Tottenham Court Road station mosaic tilework on the left, the green accent lines of the station along the left and right walls and around the tunnel entrance, and the typical elements you’ll find at most platforms: The station name in London Underground roundels, vending machines, emergency call telephones, benches, huge adverts on the wall next to the track, more adverts on most every other vertical surface…and litter. There are no trash bins down in the London Underground, due to fears of bombs being placed in them by terrorist groups (previously the IRA, and now anti-Western extremist groups like al-Qaeda).

London Underground hallway with tiled walls, Tottenham Court Road station, 1998

Each station in the London Underground has distinctive decoration. Tottenham Court Road station is distinguished by the mosaic tilework in many of its halls, and the green accent color in many locations, as seen in other photos here.

London Underground hallway, Tottenham Court Road station, 1998

A shorter hallway in the London Underground.

Welcome!

Down Underground is a blog showcasing a few photos I took down in the London Underground as research for a project.

As yet incomplete, the idea for the project is to apply a London Underground station theme to a hallway in my flat, covering the walls with maps, posters, signs, etc. Since the stations I go through the most when I’m in London are Tottenham Court Road, Leicester Square, and others in the West End, those are the ones predominantly featured in these photos.

In the meantime, here’s the images for anyone to use as source material for the look of those halls and train platforms in London that are Down Underground.